Archive for the ‘ Uncategorized ’ Category

New Podcast up on OurEMSsite.com

New Podcast is up at OurEMSsite.com talking a little bit about different levels of EMS and 5 tips on how to choose the right EMS training program for you.

OurEMSsite.com EMS Levels and 5 tips on choosing the right training program for you.

 

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New Post On OurEMSsite.com, Links of the week.

A new post on a few interesting links we have found. Hope you check them out.

OurEMSsite.com Links of the Week.

white and black moon with black skies and body of water photography during night time

Photo by GEORGE DESIPRIS on Pexels.com

Launch of OurEMSsite.com

We are very excited to be launching our brand new website at OurEMSsite. We hope you all check it out and take a listen to our very first podcast, available first at our website.

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Upcoming launch

We are very excited for the upcoming launch of our new website, blog and podcast. We hope you will join us August 1st at http://www.Ouremssite.com and embark along side us on this new endeavor.

To stay and grow or change and evolve?

I want to tell you all how much I appreciate each and every one of you. I consider our interactions here a conversation that I hope will continue for many years to come. 

I have not been as active on both Tumblr and my WordPress pages recently. I have been debating with myself. I want to start my podcast and have been researching just how I should go about doing it. It is a lot more involved than I initially knew. I have now come to a very serious question and I need everyone’s input. Please feel free to comment below, email me to ouremssite@gmail.com or private message me. 

My question is this: Should I continue OurEMSsite or should I rebrand the whole thing and begin fresh?

My goals have not changed:

1. To provide support for EMS providers everywhere.

2. To advocate for EMS providers and EMS as a career. 

3. To educate the public about EMS.

4. To grow EMS from within. To make it better.

Unfortunately I see a limit to where Ouremssite can go. Will the brand be accepted at a state level? On a lobbying board or helping local elected officials when they are pushing for legislation? That is what I don’t know and I think I need to know this before I begin the next stage of my journey. 

Any information, feedback, both good and bad is welcome.

Why I became an EMT

I was recently asked why I became an EMT.

In reality I did not know how many people are in business trying to keep other people alive. I got to see first hand what EMS can be, my younger brother had asthma and on more than one occasion I saw how close he was to not being able to breath. I was there when, I assume now but did not know then, my brother was given Epi as multiple nebulizers were failing. The paramedics and emergency personnel were able to deal calmly and efficiently with what was a horrifying event for me and my family. How can someone be so calm in such a hectic situation?

Now I know that inside the medics were probably not very calm. I have been through emergency calls where children are basically gasping during particularly severe asthma attacks. I’m also telling them to stay calm, the oxygen is coming, the medicine is working, their lungs are opening. I know how panicking can send the patient into a worse path and so have to fake my confidence when the medicines are not working as quickly as I would like.

I remember thinking that as the medical personnel arrived our emergency was done. They were here to help. Sometimes I can save someone, anaphylaxis, hypoglycemia, drug overdoses, CVA’s where the people think it’s something completely different. We can slow the situation down enough to provide care and move them to a better, more definitive care location. Sometimes all we can do is tell someone how sorry we are that their loved one has passed away and try to console them as best we can.

Sometimes that’s enough. To try. That’s what led me to EMS, to be the person that tries right at the beginning. So far for me it has been a worthwhile endeavor.

Weekly Link Post 8/15/15

I’m a little late on posting this weeks links for interesting articles I’ve read, but if you’re off of work this can be an excellent opportunity to read some very good writing. Each of these articles brings with it a very unique take on a subject and they are all worth the few minutes they take to read. Hope you enjoy.

EMSWorld – Busting Trauma Myths

We all know some of these trauma myths, we all may have followed them at one point or another. Some of us still have to follow them due to protocol. This is a great article with tons of references for those wanting to delve deeper into a specific issue.

Medic Madness – How to not be that medic in 12 easy steps

Humorous but very honest and completely true. I find it hard to stomach that probably “that medic” is the only one that won’t be reading this post.

USA Today – Cities put nurse practitioners alongside paramedics

The growing problem of ER congestion for complaints that do not deserve to be there is causing EMS services with hospitals to come up with interesting solutions. This pilot program in Anaheim, California is aimed at reducing these problems and could be a catalyst for other changes around the country.

CNN – How doctors want to die

Zocalo – How Doctors Die

These last two links are on two articles describing how doctors are usually choosing no extraordinary measures in the case of their death. I found both articles very interesting and decided to casually ask around the station what most medics would prefer. I was amazed, though I shouldn’t have been, that most would immediately say DNR. Some would put in the stipulation that if it was a reversible cause that was easily identifiable to go ahead and try to save them, but if it was something like a stroke, heart attack or massive trauma that lead to immediate death then they did not want CPR or intubation done. Some of the reasons were just how vicious CPR is, how resuscitation attempts do involve a lot of trauma on a patient. A different reason that came to light was that there is a slim chance that the body will be saved, but the patient will become completely bedridden. This was very high on the list as to why they would not want to be brought back. The thought of being a permanent patient for the rest of their lives is horrifying.

What are your thoughts? Would you want everything to be done on you to bring you back from the dead? What if you were brought back but were now completely paralyzed and would never be able to move freely again?

I hope you found some of these posts interesting and informative. As always if you have any questions or want to share one of your posts feel free to send me message. Until next time stay safe out there.

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